Based on your location, income, debt. You might be able to afford to spend 20-30 percent of your income on your mortgage, but perhaps (based on the size of your family) you only really need a scaled-down home that costs 10 percent of your income. There’s no reason to buy "more" home than you need, even if you can afford to do so.

Before applying for a mortgage, you need to think about more than just whether you can afford the monthly repayments. mortgage providers will look at your income and outgoings to see if you can keep up with repayments if interest rates rise or your circumstances change. Learn more about how lenders.

But if you’re already on the hook for other obligations, make sure you can really afford a mortgage — as well as property taxes, homeowners insurance, and maintenance — before attempting to buy a.

If you earn $56,516, the average household income, you can afford $1,695 in total monthly payments, according to the 36% rule. The rule, which measures your debt relative to your income, is used by lenders to evaluate how much you can afford.

How Much Can I Afford On Mortgage

To determine how much you can afford for your monthly mortgage payment, just multiply your annual salary by 0.28 and divide the total by 12. This will give you the monthly payment that you can afford. Some loans place more emphasis on the back-end ratio than the front-end ratio.

First Time Home Buyer What Can I Afford First time home buyer – how much can I realistically afford? Find answers to this and many other questions on Trulia Voices, a community for you to find and share local information. Get answers, and share your insights and experience.

Mortgage Type: The type of mortgage you choose can have a dramatic impact on the amount of house you can afford, especially if you have limited savings. FHA loans generally require lower down payments (as low as 3.5% of the home value), while other loan types can require up to 20% of the home value as a minimum down payment.

City Council has placed three measures on the fall ballot and this column has my take on two of them. gap between Boulder.

Here’s another simple way to look at it. Take your gross monthly income (that’s income before taxes are taken out) and multiply it by 45% – or .45 on your calculator. Then subtract your minimum monthly payments on any of your consumer debts. What’s left is the amount you generally can “afford” for a mortgage payment.

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